Blog

  • A Bulge in the Bicep

    In cartoons a bulge in the bicep is the symbol of muscularity – and that someone has been eating their spinach. In real life though, such a bulge signals something very different – and it isn’t caused by muscles at all. “It’s the biceps tendon,” said Peter Chalmers, MD, an orthopedic surgeon with University of Utah Health. “When it tears that causes the muscle to slump leading to what’s known as the ‘Popeye sign.’”

    Read More

  • Dr. Chalmers is invited to speak at the Baseball Sports Medicine Meeting

    Baseball Sports Medicine: Game-Changing Concepts

    Read More

  • Are the hamstrings from the drive leg or landing leg more active in baseball pitchers? An electromyographic study

    Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) has become a common procedure among baseball players of all levels. There are several graft choices in performing UCLR, one of which is a hamstring (gracilis or semitendinosus) autograft. It is unclear whether the hamstring muscle from a pitcher's drive leg (ipsilateral side of the UCLR) or landing leg (contralateral side of the UCLR) is more active during the pitching motion. We hypothesized that the landing leg semitendinosus will be more electromyographically active than the drive leg.

    Read More

  • Continuous interscalene brachial plexus blockade is associated with reduced length of stay after shoulder arthroplasty

    Catheter-delivered continuous interscalene anesthesia has demonstrated improved pain control in randomized clinical trials. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the introduction of continuous catheter anesthesia was associated with a change in length of stay (LOS), readmission, rates of discharge home without home health or nursing services, or opioid administration. We hypothesized that the introduction of continuous catheter anesthesia would be associated with a decrease in LOS, readmission, non-home discharge, and opioid administration.

    Read More

  • American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting

    Dr. Chalmers research is presented at the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting

    Read More

  • Angled BIO-RSA (bony-increased offset–reverse shoulder arthroplasty): a solution for the management of glenoid bone loss and erosion

    Glenoid deficiency and erosion (excessive retroversion/inclination) must be corrected in reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) to avoid prosthetic notching or instability and to maximize function, range of motion, and prosthesis longevity. This study reports the results of RSA with an angled, autologous glenoid graft harvested from the humerus (angled BIO-RSA).

    Read More

  • Perspective Baseball players see low return to play after biceps tenodesis for SLAP tears

    Professional baseball players have a difficult time returning to play after biceps tenodesis for treatment of superior labral anterior-posterior tears, according to recently presented data.

    Read More

  • Dr. Chalmers research on baseball pitchers

    Performance and return to sport in elite baseball players and recreational athletes following repair of the latissimus dorsi and teres major

    Read More

  • Stay Off The Bench: Baseball Injury Prevention

    Don’t get taken out by a curve ball. Whether you are playing little league, high school, college, or Major League Baseball there are several common injuries to be aware of. “The most common baseball injuries vary from the shoulder, elbow, knee, along with muscle strains and sprains,” said Peter Chalmers, MD, a sports medicine specialist at University of Utah Health.

    Read More

  • Doc Talk,” presented by University Health – Dr. Pete Chalmers

    Dr. Chalmers is a member of the faculty at the University of Utah within the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He focuses on the care of all shoulder and elbow problems, from young athletes to shoulder arthritis. His practice includes minimally invasive arthroscopy, ligament and tendon repair, joint replacement, reconstruction surgery, fracture care, and revision procedures. As a former coach and division I athlete, Dr. Chalmers knows the importance of getting back on the field. He sees patients at the University Orthopaedic Center, the South Jordan Health Center, and the Farmington Health Center.

    Read More

FirstPrevious | Pages 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 of 7 | Next | Last